Nuclear Policy News

Nuclear Policy News – January 26, 2017

 Nuclear Policy News – January 26, 2017

 

TOP NEWS

US and Israel Run Successful Tests of David’s Sling
Defense News

NORAD Responds After Russian Bombers Zoom Around Japan
Military News

Rattled by Pakistan? India to Test Fire Nuclear-Capable Ballistic Missile
The Diplomat

Kim Jong Un wants to meet Trump, will never give up nukes, says defector
CNN

EAST ASIA

 

China may be developing new long-range air-to-air missile
Reuters
Last year, The People's Liberation Army posted pictures online of a J-11B fighter carrying a large, unidentified missile during drills. China may be testing this new, long-range air-to-air missile that could take out early warning aircraft and aerial refueling aircraft.

 

Kim Jong Un wants to meet Trump, will never give up nukes, says defector
CNN
During his campaign, President Trump said he would be open to meeting Kim. Thae Yong Ho, the most senior North Korean diplomat to defect in almost 20 years, makes a plea for the president to reconsider, saying it would give the North Korean leader legitimacy he currently doesn't have in his own country. Kim made it clear that if the US continued its current policy against North Korea, he would continue to add nuclear weapons to the country's military capability.

 

MIDDLE EAST

 

US and Israel Run Successful Tests of David’s Sling
Defense News
The series of tests is the fifth of its kind and is a “critical step in ensuring Israel has the capability to defend itself from a very real and growing threat,” MDA director Vice Adm. James Syring stated. The tests involved all subsystems of the weapon, pitting David’s Sling against threat-representative targets and taking them out with Stunner missiles.

 

RUSSIA/FSU/EUROPE

 

NORAD Responds After Russian Bombers Zoom Around Japan
Military News
A pair of Russian Tu-95 Bear nuclear-capable bombers flew around Japan on Tuesday, prompting the Japanese military to scramble fighter jets as the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) increased its threat posture.

 

Russia says unperturbed by China’s missile deployment
Asia Times
The Kremlin mostly shrugged off Beijing’s reported deployment of intercontinental missiles near Russian borders, though some officials suggested strengthening missile defense systems near the country’s borders with China. “If this information is true, any military development in China is not perceived by us as a threat to our country,” Dmitry Peskov, spokesman for President Vladimir Putin, said in televised remarks.

 

SOUTH ASIA

 

Rattled by Pakistan? India to Test Fire Nuclear-Capable Ballistic Missile
The Diplomat
India will test launch a K-4 intermediate-range nuclear-capable ballistic missile from a submerged pontoon platform in the Bay of Bengal at the end of the month, according to local media reports.

 

 

U.S. NUCLEAR POLICY

 

Mattis to Visit South Korean and Japan in First Trip
Defense News
During the trip, the threat of North Korea will undoubtedly be on the table. Mattis said, “I don't think we should take anything off the table” in regards to stopping the development of North Korean ICBM capabilities, adding, “It's a serious threat. And I believe that we've gotta do something about it.” 

 

 

OPINIONS

 

Renew and Strengthen America’s Strategic Deterrent
Roger Burg, Breaking Defense
Many Americans are asking whether the three legs of the nuclear triad are still relevant. My answer to this question is an emphatic, yes. Today’s discussion should not be about “if” we recapitalize the triad, but instead how to enhance the execution of the strategic deterrence mission.

 

5 Burning Nuclear Problems on Trump’s Desk
Jon Wolfsthal, Foreign Policy
There are too many ways in which nuclear weapon issues can go sideways. Accidents, mistakes, conflicts that get out of control — these can happen at any time, and no administration is ever fully prepared. Getting out of the gate cleanly — something they have not been able to do on foreign policy — is essential. Without it, the new team can find themselves playing Whac-a-mole with nuclear weapons. Not a great way to make America great again.

 

How Trump Should Handle Russian Nuclear Talks
Rebeccah Heinrichs, Breaking Defense
The new administration should move forward with setting the above preconditions for talks, which will take an enormous amount of diplomatic heavy-lifting and time. But until these conditions are met, the United States will not be negotiating from a position of strength, nor will it be getting a “good deal” for the United States. With this in mind, it would be prudent for the Trump administration to set aside the notion of further nuclear reductions and focus on other security initiatives where there may be common ground with the Russians.

 

SPECIAL INTEREST

 

CSI Comes to Nuclear Security
Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists
By identifying the processing history, intended use, and production location for all nuclear materials within a state, and collating that information into a national nuclear forensics library, states would have a strong mechanism to help combat illicit trafficking.

 

Scottish Cold War nuclear submarine collision kept secret for 43 years
The Guardian
The potentially catastrophic crash occurred in November 1974 when the SSBN James Madison, armed with 16 Poseidon nuclear missiles, was heading out of the US naval base at Holy Loch, 30 miles north-west of Glasgow.

 

It is two and a half minutes to midnight: 2017 Doomsday Clock Statement
Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists
This year’s Clock deliberations felt more urgent than usual. On the big topics that concern the board, world leaders made too little progress in the face of continuing turbulence. In addition to the existential threats posed by nuclear weapons and climate change, new global realities emerged, as trusted sources of information came under attack, fake news was on the rise, and words were used in cavalier and often reckless ways

 

 

Friday's Top Nuclear Policy News

TOP NEWS

Having nuclear weapons ‘matter of life and death’ for North Korea: RIA
Reuters

Ending Iran nuclear deal would worsen North Korea situation: Kerry
Reuters

North Korea writes open letter to Parliament urging Australia to move away from Trump administration
Australian Broadcasting Corporation

Russia’s Lavrov warns one-sided changes could sink Iran deal
Associated Press

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